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Monday, February 10, 2014

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Review: Delirium by Lauren Oliver


Delirium #1
Author: Lauren Oliver
Publication Date: February 3, 2011
Publisher: HarperCollins

Amazon Best Books of the Month, February 2011: Lena Haloway is content in her safe, government-managed society. She feels (mostly) relaxed about the future in which her husband and career will be decided, and looks forward to turning 18, when she’ll be cured of deliria, a.k.a. love. She tries not to think about her mother’s suicide (her last words to Lena were a forbidden “I love you”) or the supposed “Invalid” community made up of the uncured just beyond her Portland, Maine, border. There’s no real point—she believes her government knows how to best protect its people, and should do so at any cost. But 95 days before her cure, Lena meets Alex, a confident and mysterious young man who makes her heart flutter and her skin turn red-hot. As their romance blossoms, Lena begins to doubt the intentions of those in power, and fears that her world will turn gray should she submit to the procedure. In this powerful and beautifully written novel, Lauren Oliver, the bestselling author of Before I Fall, throws readers into a tightly controlled society where options don’t exist, and shows not only the lengths one will go for a chance at freedom, but also the true meaning of sacrifice. --Jessica Schein

     It's been a little foretold before I read Delirium that I probably wouldn't like it since the majority of it is based on romance (hi... love as a disease). And if you compare all my reviews on the blog so far, there's always SOMETHING ELSE with romance. Or there's none at all, in which I'm perfectly content with. ^_^ Unless the name is required reads, in which I have no choice but to read if I want to pass English with a stellar grade.
     Although I was told by the librarian – when I mentioned I didn't like Delirium – that Lauren Oliver was trying to push about government resistance, or something of the similar sort. I'm sure that's really obvious since it's dystopian (it's a common theme), but in my humble opinion it's simply not pushed well enough.
     Delirium did start off interesting. I mean, the way the first chapter ends:
The deadliest of all deadly things: It kills you both when you have it and when you don’t.
     It's quite the curiosity and you're wondering just exactly why love is so deadly. Therefore you continue on to appease your curiosity. It's sort of the way good books work, and if you want a real life – or even online – comparison, a first impression.
     Then again, I love those types of books, as long as the author keep it up. Or they can start off slow going but not too slow and then exit with a good pow.
     Oliver's first impression for me started out really well, but then it drooped.
     Delirium spent most of it's time stalling, yet remaining interesting enough that I didn't toss it out the window and grouped it with the small club exclusively for DNFs.
     Or maybe I'm too nice of a judge when it comes to books. *raises eyebrows* No wonder the raw ratings system was invented (that really was the reason why). o_o
The one good thing about being kind of shy is that nobody bugs you when you want to be left alone.
Rating: 2.5 out of 5 Owls

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Sophia

Sophia is the owner and founder of Bookwyrming Thoughts. She also doesn't fit the Asian stereotype (maybe a little). She's a first year Communications major from the St. Louis area, though she sometimes wish she wasn't. Books, chocolate, technology, and music are among some of her favorite things. For more of her work, visit her personal website.

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All reviewed books posted on Bookwyrming Thoughts are purchased/gifted, loaned or provided by the author/publisher for free in exchange for a honest review. There is no compensation in any way or form aside from a complimentary copy of the book, and it does not influence the review.