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Wednesday, January 14, 2015

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Review: Eona by Alison Goodman

Eona by Alison Goodman

Eon #2
Author:
Alison Goodman
Publication Date: April 19, 2011
Publisher: Viking
Reviewer: Sophia

Eon has been revealed as Eona, the first female Dragoneye in hundreds of years. Along with fellow rebels Ryko and Lady Dela, she is on the run from High Lord Sethon's army. The renegades are on a quest for the black folio, stolen by the drug-riddled Dillon; they must also find Kygo, the young Pearl Emperor, who needs Eona's power and the black folio if he is to wrest back his throne from the selfstyled "Emperor" Sethon. Through it all, Eona must come to terms with her new Dragoneye identity and power - and learn to bear the anguish of the ten dragons whose Dragoneyes were murdered. As they focus their power through her, she becomes a dangerous conduit for their plans...

Eona, with its pulse-pounding drama and romance, its unforgettable fight scenes, and its surprises, is the conclusion to an epic story only Alison Goodman can create...

Apparently when Eona and Co. are on the run, things get mighty interesting and there's almost never a dull moment. There's the ten dead Dragoneyes, an entire army of Sethon's supposed minions (who knows if they're actually loyal to the dude, anyways?), and a supposed-to-be emperor by the name of Kygo who's also on the run from being brutally murdered as well.

Goodman starts out the whopping 600-paged book with a "primary" source from Teacher Prahn, quickly summarizing the events at the imperial palace in the ending of Eon, and it's helpful for those who haven't the first book in a long while (unless you have a fantastic memory, which I sometimes have. Epiphany!). The second and last book to the duology starts out shortly after those events, with Eona and her friends on the run from Sethon and the hunt for Kygo. Goodman brings us outside of the imperial palace and into other parts of the Empire of Celestial Dragons, places that were briefly mentioned in book one and now play a bigger role in book two.

I personally disliked Eona back when she was Eon, and I don't like her any better as a girl either. Back as Eon, Eona just seemed to desperate to fit in and trying to prove herself worthy – those sun drug scenes? The worst of Eon. I even vowed to DNF this book if Eona decided to run around with the sun drug again; it was that bad.

In a way, I do like Eona: she's not desperate, she's Taylor Swift fearless (all those odds stacked against her!) – she's a lot better when compared to Eon, when she trying to fully disguise herself as a guy and being a slinky. Eona just argues a lot with Kygo when she finally finds him, and I mean a huge emphasis on "argues a lot." I'm pretty sure if I get a dollar for every time they argued, I could actually pay my rent. Though compared to the lovely love triangle with Ido (thank you, so-called prophecy), I fully ship Kygo and Eona, even though Eona seems very mopey when it comes to whether or not Kygo truly loves her.
"What if I said you could have either me or my power? Which one would you choose?"
Eona certainly makes up for the many dull moments in pacing from its predecessor, where the beginning is a little interesting, the middle is extremely draggy and the decent ending is very fast and rapid. The pacing in the final book of Goodman's Eon duology is much better and engrossing, bringing us a fantastic end to two very long books.

4.5 Owls

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Sophia

Sophia is the owner and founder of Bookwyrming Thoughts, but also found on various parts of the internet. She's a 19-year-old communications major who has weird humor and doesn't fit the Asian stereotype (maybe a little). Books, chocolate, technology, and music are among some of her favorite things. For more of her work, visit her personal website.