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Tuesday, October 11, 2016

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Mini Reviews Part 1: Emily Skrutskie, Marie Lu, Isabel Bandeira, Juliana Haygert, and Richelle Mead (To Name a Few)

Hello everyone!

It's been quite awhile since I've actually written a review (aside from the ones I'm reviewing for blog tours), so I decided to slowly get back into the reviewing swing of things by doing bite sized reviews (Okay, maybe a few Chibi Views, too, and maybe one or two ended up long enough to be full reviews because I'm just so passionate about/have a passionate hate for them) of the books I read during my reviewing slump and hopefully be back to normal reviewing sometime soon. ^_^

Excuse me if I'm a little bland. I need some oil on my reviewing gears. They're a little... rusty.

The Abyss Surrounds Us by Emily Skrutskie – 5 out of 5
ARC provided by Flux Books via Netgalley
For the last few months, every time the question, "What is your latest favorite read?" popped up on Twitter, I always answered the question with The Abyss Surrounds Us. All anyone needs to know about Skrutskie's lovely debut novel is the combination of sea monsters and pirates. (I personally didn't mind the LBGT element in the book, because it doesn't play a huge part in the story and most certainly doesn't overshadow the main plot.)

Also, cutest sea monster ever – I can't even imagine such cuteness being monstrous. I want one of my own. (So long as I'm not getting eaten. Everyone else is um… fair game.)

The Rose Society by Marie Lu – 4.5 out of 5
GUYS. GUYS. GUYSSS. Fair warning.

This book. Is dark. Like really dark. It is not disturbing. It is just plain and downright darker than the pits of Hell and it can only get darker by the time the third book comes out.

Strangely, though, I really liked the sequel to The Young Elites – much better than the first one, though now I'm wondering if I would have liked it a lot more if I read the book rather than listening to the audio version. (I've always had a fondness for Adelina because helloooo. She is a villain. Villains are up my alley. The librarian spoke the truth.)


Bookishly Ever After by Isabel Bandeira – 4.5 out of 5
ARC provided by Spencer Hill Press via Netgalley
Bookishly Ever After basically proves that my life sucks and the main character's life is better... thus fictional lives are better. (Technically, fictional boys are better.)

I'll agree with some of the reviewers on Goodreads that Bandeira's debut novel doesn't actually have a plot... because it doesn't. Bookishly Ever After is an extremely light read that a plot isn't really necessary to enjoy the book – if you enjoy a really cute book with adorable main characters to boot. Phoebe, le fabulous main character, is quite literally everything that I am fictionalized aside from looks, and I am so not saying that I'm cute because I'm not that confident. However, it is highly unadvised for guys to tell Sophia that she is cute or pretty because she will very happily kick you (or throw a GIF at you).

It is, however, totally worth the read if anyone is looking for something cute and light.


The Everlasting Circle by Juliana Haygert – 4 out of 5
ARC provided by the author
Well, it's about bleeping time – okay, that probably sounds a tad bit rude (my language was totally in check).

Anyways, it's been two – two! – years since the second book came out, and I'm kind of over the top excited to return to the world Juliana Haygert built several years ago.

The greatest thing Haygert provides at the very beginning of bringing us back to the world of Everlast is a recap of the first two books up to the point of preparing for war with Imha and Omi (among others). There's also a lot of tension between Micah and Nadine from the second book carrying over to the final book, and I have to say... I don't really mind the tension. After Micah got his own novella back in the Cup of Life, I kind of have a fondness for him and it was an absolute delight to take some peeks into Micah's mind in The Everlasting Circle.

The last book in the Everlast trilogy brings a nice close to the entire series with a HEA and many, if not all, questions from the prior books answered.


The Glittering Court by Richelle Mead – 3 out of 5
ARC provided by PenguinTeen
In a few words and sentences, The Glittering Court feels like a complete mashup of the Bachelor and the Bachelorette with a disguise and a bit of sass involved. I adore sassy countesses, but unfortunately, the sass didn't really last long. Once Adelaide and Cedric finally get together, it seems like a happily ever after despite the not so great circumstances (all I could do was internally scream, "Wherefore art sass Adelaide?!?!?!"), and The Glittering Court slowly went down boring avenue.

Overall, I have mixed feelings in regards to Richelle Mead's latest book. It is definitely much different than her other books – I just feel like something might have fallen a bit of short. Maybe I've read way too many of Mead's books, but The Glittering Court felt a little too predictable – each plot twist that was meant to be unexpected and surprised came across as something completely expected.

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Sophia

Sophia is the owner and founder of Bookwyrming Thoughts. She also doesn't fit the Asian stereotype (maybe a little). She's a first year Communications major from the St. Louis area, though she sometimes wish she wasn't. Books, chocolate, technology, and music are among some of her favorite things. For more of her work, visit her personal website.

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