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Thursday, September 21, 2017

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Everything, Everything by Nicola Yoon | Review (Everything Ruined?)

Everything Everything Nicola Yoon

Everything, Everything
Author:
Nicola Yoon
Publication Date: September 1, 2015
Publisher: Delacorte Books for Young Readers
Reviewer: Sophia

My disease is as rare as it is famous. Basically, I’m allergic to the world. I don’t leave my house, have not left my house in seventeen years. The only people I ever see are my mom and my nurse, Carla.

But then one day, a moving truck arrives next door. I look out my window, and I see him. He’s tall, lean and wearing all black—black T-shirt, black jeans, black sneakers, and a black knit cap that covers his hair completely. He catches me looking and stares at me. I stare right back. His name is Olly.

Maybe we can’t predict the future, but we can predict some things. For example, I am certainly going to fall in love with Olly. It’s almost certainly going to be a disaster.

I'm part of a reading challenge on this app called Habitica where I have to read a book turning into a movie this year, so Everything, Everything kind of got picked because of that. (I know it's problematic. The reading challenges are the only reasons why I chose to read the book.)

Anelise and I were also throwing out random books from our library for hours and this was the first that we both had a copy of or could borrow from the library, so here we are.

I was hoping to learn more from Everything, Everything than I actually did. Madeline Whittier, aka Maddy, is someone who has SCID - an immune disorder where those affected basically have to be isolated from everything. I learned virtually nothing but the bare bones definition of SCID for the duration of the book:
  • You have to be isolated from the world
  • Anything, ANYTHING can trigger a reaction
  • It is basically a very miserable life
Let's be honest: it's the dictionary definition.

And everything is so WHITE. White walls, white rooms, white bookshelves - I like the occasional white but ALL white is associated with hospitals. I suppose hospital is the atmosphere Yoon is going for? Still, though. Hospitals do have a splash of color somewhere? At least I'm pretty sure they do, but I'm that one kid who rarely went to the hospital.

So if you want the really quick version: the romance is the plot. I'm usually not a fan of contemporary romance, but I've been on a contemporary streak lately after reading some amazing books lately in the genre. The romance between Mandy and Olly is adorable - seeing their limited interactions, IMs, emails, etc. and even when they saw each other outside of those. If you don't mind a cute romance or have a curiosity to know more about SCID, then Everything, Everything might be up your alley. But I like learning things. This is why I'm still Ravenclaw and not Gryffindor, so Pottermore is wrong, I tell you. WRONG.

I thought the layout was interesting and different, making the book seem quicker. I also loved the illustrations - they complemented the story really well and felt like a nice addition.

Despite the cute romance, interesting layout, and amazing illustrations, I am still disappointed with the ending. It's one of those endings that might depend on the reader’s preferences, but I thought it was a screwed up ending where some of the characters have HUGE issues. I know I have my own issues of life, but this one is a really messy issue and I'm surprised no one got even a tiny bit suspicious for what? 16, 17 years?

I know there are some out there who will turn around and say that Everything, Everything is a fantastic novel. It is! But the ending ruined everything, and I cannot add this to my collection of shove worthy books.

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Sophia

Sophia is the owner and founder of Bookwyrming Thoughts, but also found on various parts of the internet. She's a 19-year-old communications major who has weird humor and doesn't fit the Asian stereotype (maybe a little). Books, chocolate, technology, and music are among some of her favorite things. For more of her work, visit her personal website.